Wildlife TV

Learn interesting and funny plant and animal facts with videos and photos

World Lion Day – 10th August

Today is World Lion Day, a day when we should reflect on this beautiful animal’s place in our world and more importantly, our impact on its population. The lion (Panthera leo), second largest of the big cats, is the king of the beasts and admired around the world by children and adults alike for its beauty and power.

Male African Lion (Panthera leo)

Male lions (Panthera leo) have a thick mane of hair around their neck to protect them in fighting. Photo Credits.

Lions had a wide range historically; found all over Africa and much of Europe and Asia. As recently as Roman times, Lions were roaming in the wild in Italy and Greece, but these lions have now disappeared. There is a subspecies of modern lion that still lives outside of Africa; the Asiatic lion (Pentera leo persica) still has a small population of around 400 living in the Gir Forest in Gujarat, India.

Asiatic Lion (Panthera leo persica)

Asiatic lions (Panthera leo persica) are a subspecies of lion found in Gujurat India. Lions were once found in many places in Europe and Asia. Photo Credits.

Today there may be as few as 20,000-30,000 lions left in the wild and their numbers are declining. There are many threats facing the world’s remaining lions from farmers killing them to protect their livestock to poachers hoping to sell lion teeth and bones for ‘traditional medicine’.

To celebrate World Lion Day, there are many things you can do if you want to help out lions.

One of the most important things you can do is talk to people and raise awareness; tell people about the plight of lions around the world and suggest that they can also help out.

You might want to donate time or money to a conservation organisation; check out this page on the World Lion Day site to discover a whole range of groups that are working to conserve lions and see if there is any way you can help them.

You can also make sure that you prevent contributing to abuse of lions by avoiding attractions like animal circuses, or zoos/sanctuaries with poor conditions.

Lion cubs (Panthera leo) playing

Lion cubs (Panthera leo) grow up in family groups and males leave to make their own prides when they reach adulthood. Photo Credits.

Hope is not lost and the future for lions could be bright. Ethical and sustainable tourism can bring money to help conserve lions in suitable reserves and conservation groups are working tirelessly on reducing human and environmental impact on lion populations. It is never too late to make a difference and hopefully we can work together to ensure the lion can keep its thrones as king of the beasts for many generations to come.

Much love,

-Nick

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[Top 10] ~ August 2013 Photos

The African bush is filled with amazing photo opportunities which I don’t like to miss, however, after a while, I end up with hundreds of photos on my laptop and no one to show them to.

I manage to post some of the best images (such as the male Lion or the Cheetahs with kill) but for the majority of them I haven’t had the time or patience to write a proper entry about them so they linger around waiting to be forgotten.

For that reason I have decided that at the end of each month I’ll try to post a “top 10” photos for you to see. I apologise for starting this top 10 already half way through September but I promise that the next ones will be on time!
I have plenty more photos but I don’t want to end up “spamming” the blog with too many so I’ll post and organise them on the Wildlife TV Pinterest page. If you would like to see more of specific animals (birds, antelopes, predators, etc), landscapes or just South African wildlife in general feel free to follow the appropriate boards.

For now I hope you enjoy August’s selection!

 

Male African Lion (Panthera leo) uses some branches from a tree to scratch in the South African savannah.

Male African Lion (Panthera leo) uses some branches from a tree to scratch his head.

Small baby African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) keeps close to the mother for protection in the South African savannah.

Baby African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) keeps close to the mother for protection.

Two Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) eat their latest kill, a baby Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) in the South African savannah.

Two Cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) eat their latest kill, a baby Kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros).
More Photos.

Female Klipspringer (Oreotragus oreotragus) runs across the road to meet her partner on the other side. Taken in the South African savannah.

Female Klipspringer (Oreotragus oreotragus) runs across the road to meet her partner on the other side.

Black Backed Jackal (Canis mesomelas) carries the tail of a Blue Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) killed by Lions (Panthera leo) on the previous day. Take on the wild South African savannah.

Black Backed Jackal (Canis mesomelas) carries the tail of a Blue Wildebeest (Connochaetes taurinus) killed by the Lion (Panthera leo) pride on the previous day.

Male Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) standing proud on the South African savannah.

Male Waterbuck (Kobus ellipsiprymnus) standing proud on the South African savannah.

Big African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) bull eating some tasty leaves from a tree branch while keeping an eye on us. Taken on the wild South African savannah.

Big African Elephant (Loxodonta africana) bull eating some tasty leaves from a tree branch while keeping an eye on us.

Male Steenbok (Raphicerus campestris) foraging for food in the South African savannah.

Male Steenbok (Raphicerus campestris) foraging for food in the South African savannah.

Male Lion (Panthera leo), the king of the jungle, wandering around the savannah

Male Lion (Panthera leo), the king of the jungle, patrolling the savannah.
More Photos.

Sofia and Nick from Wildlife TV blog on the 28th August (Sofia's birthday)

Sofia and Nick on the 28th August (Sofia’s birthday)

Até à próxima!

~Sofia.


If you liked this entry, make sure you check out our Photography category.
Previous Photography entries:
[Photo] Cheetah with kill
[Photo] Lion: The King of the Jungle
Photo Previews 14
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Chinese Zoo tries to pass off dog as an African Lion

One of the my favourite places to go visit as a kid was the Zoo. I don’t like seeing animals in captivity but when growing up in Europe there’s not many other options to see African animals. As long as the animals are being treated properly and the zoo providing an educational program for the visitors I like to think they are helping our planet by making sure the younger generations sees and falls in love with the species and, hopefully, later on help out in conservation and ecology projects.

But things can go wrong if the zoo is not properly managed or like the following one in China, tries to deceive the visitors.

A zoo in a park in Louhe, situated in the central province of Henan, China, decided that not having an African lion should not be a reason to not display an African lion.. Instead they found it fitting to put a Tibetan Mastiff in the enclosure and just call it a lion. Hopefully no one would notice right? At least not until the dog started barking..

I’ve seen many lions in captivity and in the wild and if there is something I can assure you is that African lions do not bark.. They might roar, growl and sometimes even meow, but they definitely do not woof..

Check out below the poor dog that was chosen to work as a lion substitute.

 

Tibetan Mastiff playing the role of an African Lion at the Louhe Zoo in China.

Tibetan Mastiff playing the role of an African Lion at the Louhe Zoo in China.
Photo Credits

 

It is definitely a pretty dog but this is how an African lion (Panthera leo) is supposed to look like:

 

Male Lion (Panthera leo), the king of the jungle, wandering around the savannah

 

And if you think that the Chinese staff at the zoo decided that having an animal posing as another animal was enough, you are very wrong.
They also had a white fox pretending to be a Leopard, dogs pretending to be wolves and rats as snakes.

I’m shocked at how they thought any of these trades would fool anyone..

Their excuse was that the lion and the leopard were both away on a breeding program and would be back soon and in the meanwhile the dog and the fox were filling in for them. I wonder what was their excuse for the rats posing as snakes..

Such a strange strange planet we live in..

 

Até à próxima.

~Sofia.

 

If you liked this entry, make sure you check out our News category.
Previous News entries:
Elephants avoid a full moon when being naughty
What perfume to wear on an African safari
Adam Sandler attacked by cheetah in South Africa
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