Wildlife TV

Learn interesting and funny plant and animal facts with videos and photos

[Top 10] ~ October 2013 Photos

This past month has been crazy. Many things happened (most of them bad unfortunately) but I still managed to get some nice photos. This time I was mostly focusing on getting photos from my surroundings, images of species that are seen so many times around the reserve that most people don’t look twice. I still hope you like it!


A beautiful specimen of a Cape White-Eye (Zosterops pallidus) on a nearby tree.

A beautiful specimen of a Cape White-Eye (Zosterops pallidus) on a nearby tree.

A male Chacma Baboon (Papio ursinus) keeps track of his surroundings to help protect his troop.

A male Chacma Baboon (Papio ursinus) keeps track of his surroundings to help protect his troop.

A Helmet Guinea Fowl (Numida meleagris) making a lot of noise.

A Helmet Guinea Fowl (Numida meleagris) making a lot of noise.

A robber fly, a very strange looking insect.

A robber fly, a very strange looking insect.

A beautifully coloured solifuge, one of the most interesting types of arachnids.

A beautifully coloured solifuge, one of the most interesting types of arachnids.

A Southern Rock Agama (<em>Agama atra</em>) gets a well deserved sunbathing on a large rock.

A Southern Rock Agama (Agama atra) gets a well deserved sunbathing on a large rock.

A Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) sniffs the area looking for food.

A Warthog (Phacochoerus africanus) sniffs the area looking for food.

A male Chinspot Batis (Batis molitor) rests on a tree branch.

A male Chinspot Batis (Batis molitor) rests on a tree branch.

An African Striped Skink (Trachylepsis striata) enjoys the afternoon sun of the African savannah.

An African Striped Skink (Trachylepsis striata) enjoys the afternoon sun of the African savannah.

A dung beetle frantically rolls a fresh ball of a very special dung.

A dung beetle frantically rolls a fresh ball of a very special dung.

Até à próxima!

~Sofia.


If you liked this entry, make sure you check out our Photography category.
Previous Photography entries:
[Top 10] ~ September 2013 Photos
[Top 10] ~ August 2013 Photos
[Photo] Cheetah with kill
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[Photo] Cheetah with kill

One of the perks of living in the middle of the African savannah is getting to watch real life and death situations.

Just two days ago we were driving around in the game drive vehicle on a normal safari day when we encountered a female cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) with her two young cubs just next to the road with their fresh kill. Unfortunately we didn’t get to see the chase (that would have been amazing) but we did see the end result, a dead baby kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) with a very badly damaged neck.

All three cheetahs were just resting by the shade next to the recently deceased antelope, probably trying to regain some energy after the afternoon hunt. The mother was laying down just in front of the carcass and the two young juveniles were on each of her side.

They were lucky enough to manage to eat the entire animal before one of the big cats (leopard (Panthera pardus) or the lions (Panthera leo) around the area) stole it from them so they got their bellies quite full. Took them 2 days to eat the animal completely and leave the area.

Check out the photos I took of them with the young dead kudu.

 

Female mom cheetah (Acynonyx jubatus) chases, catches and kills a prey baby kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) for her cubs

Female mom cheetah (Acynonyx jubatus) chases, catches and kills a prey baby kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) for her cubs (one of the right)

Female mom cheetah (Acynonyx jubatus) chases, catches and kills a prey baby kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) for her cubs

Female mom cheetah (Acynonyx jubatus) chases, catches and kills a prey baby kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) for her cubs

Hope you liked it.

Até à próxima!

~Sofia.


If you liked this entry, make sure you check out our Photography category.
Previous Photography entries:
[Photo] Lion: The King of the Jungle
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Hiding in plain sight

Previously we’ve discussed how the impala uses camouflage to escape and/or confuse predators. Many animals employ this technique in the wild and sometimes they will be just in front of us and we still can’t seem to see them.

Today we would like to share a few amazing photos from Mr. Art Wolfe that exemplifies exactly how fantastic animals’ camouflages can be.

Try to find the animal(s) in each photo. No help given!

 

Hidding in plain sight game - Find the animal (camouflage)

Hidding in plain sight game - Find the animal (camouflage)

Hidding in plain sight game - Find the animal (camouflage)

Hidding in plain sight game - Find the animal (camouflage)

Hidding in plain sight game - Find the animal (camouflage)

Hidding in plain sight game - Find the animal (camouflage)

Did you find them all?

~Sofia.

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